Charles Leclerc revealed that due to the new aero regulations of the 2021 Formula One season, the cars are more difficult to manage on corner entries as their rear ends are more unstable than last year’s.

After a first Grand Prix weekend in Bahrain, all the drivers had a good opportunity to be pushing their single-seaters again and find their new limits, following this season’s new regulations that had a great impact in terms of downforce on F1 cars.

Charles Leclerc had a very solid weekend as he managed to qualify in P4 which is extremely impressive considering Ferrari’s great struggles last season. During this year’s offseason, the Italian team has done a tremendous job to develop a new engine and a new aero concept for 2021.

Scuderia Ferrari’s Monegasque driver, Charles Leclerc admitted that the SF21 felt much better in terms of straight-line speed and noticed a difference in corner entries as the rear of the car became less stable due to the floor changes teams had to take into account for the 71st F1 season. Therefore, the very famous ‘oversteer’ phenomenon was increased on corner entries, making it easier to spin if the drivers are not careful enough.

“In terms of driving [style] there were no changes, but there is something different (…), You have to push a little less when entering corners because the rear of the car is more difficult to manage due to the modified floor,” Leclerc said to Motorsport.com.

The 23 years old is well known for liking cars with a loos rear end. This ability probably helped him manage Ferrari’s 2020 challenger better than former teammate Sebastian Vettel as the SF1000 was reportedly very unstable on the rear end.

“I like a rear that moves so that I can use it to turn the car. Other drivers suffer from this aspect. The SF1000 had a rear that wasn’t very stable, and that was never a problem for me, but I can’t answer for Seb. It’s just a characteristic that suits my driving style,” Leclerc revealed.

Hello there! My name is Thibault and I am a French motorsports fan. Hope you'll like my articles :)