Formula 1 can be expensive, even for the fans. As it starts to hide in pay-TV programs, F1’s plan is to give people from local communities or a poor background easy access to a GP through discounted and free tickets.

“We know that attending an F1 event can be expensive,” said F1 director of strategy and business Yath Gangakumaran at the inaugural Autosport International Connect. Therefore, the sport now plans to give people within local communities of the races, or from a poor background a discount for Formula 1 tickets. To raise the accessibility to visit a Formula 1 race for those, F1 wants to give them not only tickets for a discounted price but also the chance for free vouchers.

In general, the sport’s strategy is to improve diversity and inclusion in the world. Within its ‘We Race As One’ campaign, the sport wants to continue the work on this plan in the future. A part of the plan also is to fund a scholarship for people from a privileged background to help them on a potential route to Formula 1. Furthermore, the series wants to reflect its industry to society.

However, going to a Formula 1 race often proved to be nearly impossible for those from a lower background due to the high ticket prices. Further, F1 moved to pay-TV in many countries which exposed another difficulty. That’s why they aim to change that and provide easier access to the races by planned discounts for these certain groups. After admitting that visiting a Formula 1 race can be expensive, Yath Gangakumaran continued saying that “It’s slightly different, obviously in that you’re paying for three days and several hours worth of content across a weekend versus say a football match which is just 90 minutes on one day. That being said, it’s still a significant outlay.”

Later he explained Formula 1’s plan: “As part of our second pillar about sustainable events by 2025, a key component is working with each of the promoters to see where we can ensure that people from the local community, particularly from underprivileged backgrounds are able to access the events at either a heavily discounted rate or free of charge.” He moved on stating “that [it] is something that is being worked through with the different promoters. It will take time, and obviously, everyone is coming out of a coronavirus situation which has really hit hard event operates. But that is something we are working on with the promoters as we work on meeting our goals for 2025.”

Formula 1 wants the races to become totally sustainable by 2025. By 2030, the sport then wants to be fully carbon-neutral. A big step has already been the cut-back in the usage of single-use plastics. From the Spanish Grand Prix on, an even bigger significant drive is planned in this area.

Founder and CEO of ASN Motorsports. From Balcarce, Argentina - I love motorsports, especially Formula 1, and through ASN I share my passion with the world.